How does ST.MARY’S HOME support the huge cost of looking after these 120 or more children in these difficult days?

Here we would like to give an answer that comes from our Christian faith in God and his providential care for orphans, poor widows and the down-trodden.

Chicken rearing

Many years back when the Sisters were looking after around 30 children only, it happened that the Sisters had no rice to cook for the next morning. Their faith in God and in the intervention of St. Joseph, led them to tie a bit of rice in a piece of cloth and placing it at the feet of St. Joseph, said a prayer and went to bed. The next morning, a Buddhist gentleman came into the compound bringing two 20 kg bags of rice and explained himself this way. “While sleeping last night, I had a dream. In the dream, I saw a line of women dressed in white, walking along the road. It looked like our Buddhist nuns going for alms collection but I realized that they were not our Buddhist nuns because these were dressed not in yellow robes but in white habits. So, I reckoned that these must be the catholic nuns from ST.MARY’S HOME and so I brought these two bags of rice”. Imagination? No. Coincidence? No. Our faith in God tells us that it is His providential caring for the poor through the medium of that Buddhist gentleman and the catholic Sisters at the HOME.

Goat breeding
Goat breeding
Layer chicken project
Layer chicken project

It is also true that God helps only those who help themselves. So, the Sisters have to work very hard to earn the food, clothing, medicines, books and stationary, school fees for all the children, slippers, umbrellas, ball-pens, soaps, lunch boxes etc. Since private tuition is the only way to pass the examinations, the Sisters themselves have to give private coaching besides hiring teachers of repute to give the costly private tuition which in Myanmar is a sine qua non.

What are some of the self-support projects which the Sisters are involved in?

ST.MARY’S CAMPUS has a big and good enough land to cultivate and support first and foremost those girls who wish to dedicate their lives as nuns in order to be the hands, mouths, feet etc. of the risen and living Christ and thus continue the work of Christ to the people of today. As a practical demonstration of what it means to be called to be a nun today, those training to be nuns are given practical training at the HOME. The Sisters are working and training the children to grow many kinds of vegetables and many kinds of fruits. They are also running several self-support projects like chicken rearing, fish, goats and pigs breeding. The income from these self-support projects are used to defray partially the high cost of looking after so many children year in and year out.

Fish rearing

By sheer dint of hard work, the Sisters earn what they can. The rest of the expenditure is met by donations from generous donors both from within and without. That Buddhist gentleman’s donation of the two bags of rice at a desperate time, has taught us two realities: hard work and trusting prayer. Speaking of hard work, for the Sisters at the HOME, day begins very early in the morning around 4 when they have to begin preparing the morning meal and the 120 lunch boxes which each girl will pick up from the kitchen and walk off to school, some two miles away from the HOME. After children leave for school, the hard work of cleaning the dormitory and washing the clothes dirtied by wetting at night continues till mid-day. When the children return from school, the Sisters have to lead them to work in the garden in order to grow the vegetables needed for the kitchen. The slogan is: the more vegetables you grow, the more vegetables you will consume.

Pig breeding
Pig breeding

Cultivating vegetable garden
Cultivating vegetable garden